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What’s on your desk

Moving to a home office sometimes means making the most of a little space. Taylor Lyles, a writer at The Verge, is one of those who has used imagination and tech know-how to create a great working area out of a small part of her room. Here’s how she did it. (And if you’re curious, a list of her tech is at the end of this article.) First, tell us a little about yourself. What is your background, and what do you do at The Verge? I’m from Maryland, born

While many of us moved to home offices when companies sought to avoid COVID-19 infection, for some people, working at home is the norm. One of those people is Sam Byford, Asia editor for The Verge, who works out of a home office in Tokyo, Japan. We talked to Sam to find out how he has equipped his own home office and to see whether it matters these days if your remote desk is five miles away or about 6,700 miles away from your organization’s main office. Tell us a

It’s hard enough to be a writer, reviewer, and tech enthusiast for The Verge under normal circumstances. It’s even harder when you’re working out of a shared studio apartment during a pandemic. Cameron Faulkner, who not only handles our deals pages but also writes on a wide variety of topics, has somehow managed it. We asked him to explain how. Tell me a little about yourself. What is your background, and what do you do at The Verge? Hi! Tech has always been my passion, and I’ve been happily writing

Working from home has its advantages, but one of the problems that many people have to face is trying to find enough space in a crowded environment. Jon Porter, who is the London-based news reporter for The Verge, has had to be especially resourceful in putting together a place where he could report, write, and review. We talked to Jon to find out how he’s managed to do such great reporting out of a small space. Tell me a little about yourself. What do you do at The Verge? I’m

Many people who used to commute to an office every day have passed the six-month mark as remote workers, and we are now working from home offices, dining room tables, desks set up in the corners of bedrooms, or living room sofas. The folks here at The Verge are no different, and we thought it might be interesting to talk to some of our co-workers and find out how they’re coping with roommates, kids, spouses, and other distractions — not to mention having to find a place in their homes

Like many businesses, the staff of The Verge has largely decamped to our homes. Starting in early March, we packed up our laptops and headphones, and we are now working from home offices, dining room tables, desks set up in the corners of bedrooms, or living room sofas. We thought it would be fun to find out, six months later, what adjustments the staff has made to their various living quarters in order to be able to turn out the same journalism that was formerly produced in an office setting.

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